The Sound of Birds Stopping By…..

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Construction of birdhouses and bird feeders can be as simple or as complex as you wish to make it. Bird feeders can look like tiny bungalows, wooden A-frames or miniature chalets. Bird houses need no ornamentation to serve the birds using them, but an attractive design can enhance a yard. Thus, the custom built bird feeders are for the person filling them not for the birds.

My neighbor has two wood salad bowls with a wooden rod through the center. The house across the street has a large glass hanging feeder.  

A feeder could be attached to any window.   It will bring the  bird up  close for an exciting view.   The tube bird feeder,  found in any variety store,  could be fun.   One neighbor has a  bird feeder  made from old car license plates.

My  nephew  made an egg carton bird feeder in school. My Aunt Hilda has bird houses made out of gourds hanging off of her porch. My grandmother has a rustic barn creation bird feeder that has painted on the top, “See Rock City.”

Building a bird house can be purely practical or absolutely outrageous.   In   Greenwood  I have found bird house  and  feeders built to resemble a  gazebo,  a church,  a log cabin,  a totem-like housing complex,  a pagoda,  a school house,  even a little outhouse!    It was a one-holer of a different sort.

Would the blue jays, sparrows, starlings or finches that visit the feeder in my yard be more excited if I had a little deck for the feathered guests to stand on? I think not.

Bird feeder and houses are designed to bring pleasure for you and benefit our feathered friends. Where is it written that I have to build a fanciful birdhouse? It doesn’t seem to matter to the birds.

Mix together my plain and simple looking bird feeder with bird seed and it looks like a scene from the movie  The Birds  in the back yard.  Works for me.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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What’s In The Mailbox ?

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After the hubby left his car out of gear and it rolled down the driveway and over the mailbox, he spent Wednesday installing a new one.

Remember  when  a  mailbox  was  just  a  mailbox ?

Does it ease the pain of going for that utility bill if your mailbox resembles a swan, as in the case of a house near Main Street ?

Does it make the pain of after-Christmas credit card bills a little easier if your mailbox is a big daisy like the one south of town ?

Or does it help to decorate the mailbox each holiday? I noticed that the mailbox on North Street always decorates each holiday. Soon after Christmas the mailbox has red hearts for Valentines Day soon to be replaced with shamrocks.

I wonder if you are less apt to get another person’s mail if your name is Fox and your mailbox looks like a fox ?

I also question if you would get less junk mail if your mailbox looked like a pig like the one near Indianapolis ?

There is a wagon wheel mailbox on US 31 and a cow mailbox on US 41, a Garfield (cat) mailbox is on the south side of town and a Dalmatian (dog) mailbox on the north side of town.

Does a different mail box make your mail service better? More than likely, no.  It might brighten up your letter carrier’s day, but he or she will still leave mail addressed to “occupant.”

At our house? We voted on a traditional one . . . one that, if knocked over again will do minimum damage to the automobile.